Why It’s fun talking about people?

Posted on March 3, 2012

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We all know that talking about someone behind is wrong. But to be honest, is rather difficult to avoid. Actually, what makes a habit is not good it feels fun?

Comfort arising from gossiping. That’s experts provide answers to the questions above. Some sentences gossip we share with friends, coworkers, or family, is mentioned can make us feel good and superior.

Laurent Begue, a social psychologist, says that about 60 percent of the content of the conversation between an adult is about someone who was not present. “And many of them on our judgment about people who talk about it,” he said.

He explained that the gossip can form social bonds because of shared dislikes another person may create a sense of similarity compared to the range of something positive.

“Two people who knew each other not to feel closer when they share gossip about the third person. It’s become sort of a way to share values and a sense of humor,” he said.

Gossip is also a way to tell people how we connect with people who have never met. For example, we may feel “familiar” friend of the working environment stories are scattered.

In addition, sometimes the “secret” that we share with someone considered to be indicative of our belief. “Sometimes our hearts glad to hear the words ‘do not tell anyone’ from the mouths of people who spread the story of the secret,” he said.

Anthropologist Robin Dunbar even mentions that gossip is a vital factor in the evolution of brain development. “Language is created because of the need to spread rumors,” he said.

Yet gossip can also be a way to share your concerns and seek support. It became an indirect way to express our desires. For example, we talked about how sexy clothes to wear our brother. Maybe we really want to convince ourselves that we are no less sexy.

However, after all the gossip could ruin a lot of things, especially the beliefs of others. Gossiping in the office can even cause you to look less professional.

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Posted in: Psychology